Parenting Time

Vancouver Shared and Equal Parenting Time Lawyers

Shared and Equal Parenting Time Works. And it’s Attainable.

In almost every family law case involving children, my clients are concerned to discuss with me what their parenting time is going to look like following separation and how their parenting time with their children is going to be allocated.  In the majority of cases, client’s are concerned to ensure that they have, at a minimum, 50/50 equal parenting time, or what Vancouver child custody lawyers refer to as a “shared parenting arrangement”.  Generally speaking, a 50/50 “shared parenting arrangement” arises when a parent has parenting time with their child for not less than 40 percent of the time over the course of a year.

If you feel your child would benefit from 50/50 shared and equal parenting arrangement, call our highly experienced Vancouver 50/50 shared and equal parenting time lawyers today for your free initial consultation on 604 620 8682. We are here to help you with your BC child support shared and equal parenting arrangement dispute.

Is Shared Parenting or Equal Custody in Your Child’s Best Interest?

Research points to a myriad of positive results from Vancouver 50/50 shared and equal parenting regimes for children.  Studies have shown that children who enjoy the presence of both parents grow up to be better adjusted and emotionally secure than those who don’t. These children score higher on academic testing, have a stronger sense of well-being, higher levels of self esteem, more developed social skills and are less likely to engage in excessive drug or alcohol use.

For an excellent paper on the benefits of 50/50 shared parenting, I encourage my client’s to read the following paper, “After divorce, shared parenting is best for children’s health, development“, Richard A. Warshak, May 26, 2017

When considering how your child’s time with you and your ex is going to be determined and whether a 50/50 shared and equal parenting regime should be implemented, the court will at all times be guided by what is in your child’s best interest. In considering what arrangement is in your child’s “best interest”, the court will weigh the following non-exhaustive factors:

  • The degree of bonding between your child and parent or other caregiver;
  • Your child’s need for stability and security, given your child’s age and stage of development;
  • Each parent’s ability to act as a parent to a child and exercise their duties as a parent;
  • The willingness and ability of parents to exercise parenting time;
  • Your child’s health and emotional well-being;
  • Your child’s views, unless it would be inappropriate to consider them (The degree to which the wishes of your child will be considered is generally speaking dependent on the age and maturity of the child);
  • The nature and strength of the relationships between your child and significant persons in the child’s life;
  • The history of your child’s care / preservation of your child’s “status quo” home life;
  • The impact of any family violence on the child’s safety, security or well-being, whether the family violence is directed toward the child or another family member;
  • Whether the actions of a person responsible for family violence indicate that the person may be impaired in his or her ability to care for the child and meet the child’s needs;
  • The appropriateness of an arrangement that would require the child’s guardians to cooperate on issues affecting the child, including whether requiring cooperation would increase any risks to the safety, security or well-being of the child or other family members.

A 50/50 Schedule Works Best When:

  • Both parents live reasonably close to each other, which makes frequent exchanges easier.
  • The parents are able to civilly communicate with each other on topics concerning the child without fighting.
  • The child is well adjusted and able to handle moving between each parents’ homes.
  • Both parents are committed to putting the child’s best interest first, relationship issues with their ex do not affect their parenting.
  • The parents agree that the 50/50 schedule is the best one for their child and are able to work together.

If you would like to discuss whether 50/50 shared and equal parenting time is in your child’s best interest or have questions relating to how your Vancouver 50/50 shared and equal parenting time with your children should be structured, call our Top Vancouver 50/50 shared and equal parenting time lawyers at Nasser Allan LLP at 604 620 8682 today.  We look forward to working with you.